Sleight

Bad ideas find purchase in the minds of the infirm. They are particularly appealing to the unwell — those with allergies, poor teeth, badgered immunity; those in whom the psychosoma is divided against itself, who seem always to be rejected, dogged and agitated by the natural environments in which they find themselves. If a host of these compromised specimens is made by unsavory ideas which, when in practice, accelerate the host’s decline, the disassembling ideas are proven able and should be considered battle-worthy.

In this population, infected as it were, a predisposition to self-destruction will become evident. This population, though sizable, must be permitted its course. Any attempt to rehabilitate the fundamentally unwell will impede nature’s attempt to deftly excise its weakest members. The mistake is to believe that nature corrects only through cataclysm; nature too corrects by sleight.

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